Print is not dead, it’s thriving as we roll into 2020

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Who said print is dead? It seems we have been faced with the same scare at least once every decade: the print culture is dying or it’s already dead. Not so fast. If that were the case, why are so many mailboxes filled with direct marketing mailers each day? Or, why are people still getting brochures and business cards printed for their businesses? It’s because a well-rounded marketing campaign has room for both digital and print media. And, some would argue that the oversaturation of digital marketing makes print stand out that much more.

At least that’s what, Vladimir Gendelman of CompanyFolders.com, a well-known presentation folder printing business, thinks.

“It’s the perfect medium for driving engagement because it’s more concise, more enduring, and less prone to distractions than a digital ad or a TV/radio commercial,” he said.

By putting the brand in the hands of the people, print marketing provides a tangible way for consumers to interact with the brand. It also can have a longer shelf life than digital messages, as many people like to keep them around to refer back to later.

By comparison, a saved email has a higher chance of getting lost in the shuffle as more and more emails are received, to push that saved message further and further toward the bottom of the inbox.

Brandon Oritz of Salesforce.org agreed that there is a place for print in advertising.

“The ubiquity of digital media has given print media a strange new power,” he said.

“Think of how special it is to get a written letter as opposed to an email. If you’re trying to target a C-level audience, forget email — their assistant will just hit delete. But if you take your e-book, print it as a nice brochure and mail it to the exec’s office, it might get to their desk and leave a lasting impression.”

In fact, the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) has found direct mail’s response rate is higher than the average email response rate, 4.4% to 0.12%.

Yory Wurmser, director of marketing and media insights at the DMA echoed Gendelman’s sentiments about why this is possible.

“Because of the proliferation of emails and the onslaught of display ads everywhere, there is an advantage of going through direct mail,” Wurmser told dmnews.com. “Direct mail has become less cluttered.”

People are also more excited to see mail in their mailboxes outside their door over another email, according to Gallop findings. About 41% of Americans look forward to checking their mailboxes each day, displaying an overall more positive reaction to the physical mail over the electronic.

Don’t forget about those people who prefer to read their articles from an actual paper in their hands, whether it’s a newspaper, magazine or pamphlet. Using printed materials for your advertising could be opening up your business to a new audience.

This is where the print and digital world can merge by using a QR code or social media link on your print materials as a bridge to the digital. It doesn’t have to be only in direct mail. It can be through business cards, print magazines or brochures.

Not only will this help put clients in touch with your brand, but it will also expand your ability to provide information about your company past the confines of the printed material.

As long as people still receive information physically and digitally there will be a place for print, whether it’s a magazine, a billboard, or a postcard. A great marketing campaign recognizes that. So while others continue to talk about the death of print and focus only on digital advertising, others will recognize its worth.

Long live print.

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